Last edited by Malam
Tuesday, May 12, 2020 | History

10 edition of Spenserian poetics found in the catalog.

Spenserian poetics

idolatry, iconoclasm, and magic

by Kenneth Gross

  • 218 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by Cornell University Press in Ithaca, N.Y .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Spenser, Edmund, 1552?-1599,
  • Epic poetry, English -- History and criticism,
  • Idols and images in literature,
  • Iconoclasm in literature,
  • Magic in literature,
  • Gods in literature

  • Edition Notes

    StatementKenneth Gross.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPR2358 .G76 1985
    The Physical Object
    Pagination271 p. ;
    Number of Pages271
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2552414M
    ISBN 100801418054
    LC Control Number85047701

      Unfortunately, for somebody writing a book subtitled "A Handbook of Poetics," Turco not only doesn't attempt to make this handbook easy to use, at times he seems to bend over backwards to cause as much frustration as possible. Take, for instance, an example. Let's say you want to write a Spenserian stanza/5(14). Book Reviews Spenserian Poetics: Idolatry, Iconoc/asm, and Magic by Kenneth Gross. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, Pp. $ "Idolatry" and "Iconoclasm" name the dialectic that informs the analysis in this undeniably intelligent study of Spenser; magic, "the third key word of.

    Spenserian stanza The unit of Edmund Spenser’s long poem The Faerie Queene, consisting of eight iambic-pentameter lines and a final alexandrine, with a rhyme scheme of ABABBCBCC. Later uses of this stanza form include John Keats’s “The Eve of St. Agnes,” Percy Bysshe Shelley’s “Adonais,” and Alfred Lord Tennyson’s “The Lotos-Eaters.”. Chapter THE POETICAL BOOKS. This is a poetical book with an introduction, or prologue, and a sequel or epilogue, in prose. The former gives the character and circumstances of the man, together with a vain attempt of Satan to prove that his motive in serving God was a selfish one. After the failure of Satan's attempt, which left Job in.

      These glosses, as have long been recognized, stand at the center of this book's poetics of estrangement, displacement, and indirection. As the editors of the Tale Shorter Edition note, these glosses "raise unhelpful assistance to a new power" (Spenser , 6).   The Cambridge Companion to Spenser provides an introduction to Spenser that is at once accessible and rigorous. Fourteen specially commissioned essays by leading scholars bring together the best recent writing on the work of the most important non-dramatic Renaissance poet. The contributions provide all the essential information required to appreciate and understand Spenser's rewarding and Reviews: 1.


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Spenserian poetics by Kenneth Gross Download PDF EPUB FB2

"The Book of Forms" is an excellent resource for the study and understanding of poetic forms. Turco presents an abundance of information that will enable the aspiring poet to look beyond craftsmanship. The book is loaded with examples of Spenserian poetics book artistic possibilities of Cited by: Spenserian Poetics: Idolatry, Iconoclasm, and Magic Hardcover – January 1, by Kenneth Gross (Author) › Visit Amazon's Kenneth Gross Page.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author. Are you an author. Cited by: A poetics of idolatry --Mythmaking in Hibernia (A view of the present state of Ireland) --Dialectics of idolatry (Orgoglio and Arthur) --Idols of the quest (The legend of Britomart) --Eden without idols (The garden of Adonis) --Enchantment and disenchantment (Mount Acidale, the blatant beast, the Faunus episode) --Coda: the veil of idolatry.

Kenneth Gross. Spenserian Poetics: Idolatry, Iconoclasm, & Magic. Ithaca: Cornell Uni-versity Press, [i.e., ]. $ Reviewed by Robert F. Gleckner In my recent Blake and Spenser book I strongly recom-mended to all Blakeans Kathleen Williams's Spenser s World of Glass as not only a fine study of Blake's Renais-sance File Size: 1MB.

This book began with a set of contentions about two approaches to The Faerie Queene, to Spenserian poetics, and to Renaissance literature, and an attempt to bring these two approaches together. Material culture and space have recently taken an increasingly prominent place in criticism of the early modern period, and work on them has contributed.

Even if Blake didn’t, indeed couldn’t and wouldn’t if he could, think in Gross’s terms, one might still imagine a scholarly Blake scribbling assorted huzzahs in the margins of his copy of Spenserian Poetics. At its Spenserian poetics book it is a book that underwrites Blake’s sense of Spenser’s redeemability (I hope not merely my sense of Blake’s.

Spenserian stanza, verse form that consists of eight iambic pentameter lines followed by a ninth line of six iambic feet (an alexandrine); the rhyme scheme is ababbcbcc. The first eight lines produce an effect of formal unity, while the hexameter completes the thought of the ed by Edmund Spenser for his poem The Faerie Queene (–), the Spenserian stanza has origins in the.

a book that any subsequent critic of either Arcadia will have to take into account. Thelma N. Greenfield/ University of Oregon Spenserian Poetics: Idolatry, Iconoclasm, and Magic Kenneth Gross/Ithaca, N.Y., and London: Cornell University Press, Pp. On close scrutiny, the iconoclastic reflex that asserts itself periodically throughout.

This memorial note is by Kenneth Gross, who teaches English at the University of Rochester. His books include Spenserian Poetics: Idolatry, Iconoclasm, and Magic; The Dream of the Moving Statue; Shakespeare’s Noise; Shylock Is Shakespeare; and Puppet: An Essay on Uncanny will also appear in the winter issue of the Blake Quarterly.

The poetry of William Blake was wrought. Books shelved as poetry-poetics: The Iliad by Homer, The Odyssey by Homer, Calling a Wolf a Wolf by Kaveh Akbar, Metamorphoses by Ovid, and Life on Mars. This observation is often implicit in Spenserian criticism of the classic era such as A.

Hamilton, The Structure of Allegory in The Faerie Queene, Clarendon P,and Paul J. Alpers, The Poetry of The Faerie Queene, Princeton UP, Hamilton and Alpers, with Jonathan Goldberg, Endlesse Worke: Spenser and the Structures of Discourse, The Johns Hopkins UP,cover much of the ground Author: Roland Greene.

No history of the longstanding critical tradition of exploring the Spenser-Ovid relationship has been written. In this book Professor Stapleton constructs such a critical history: the annotations of E.

in The Shepheardes Calender (), the Enlightenment editions of The Faerie Queene, the philological mode of the Spenser Variorum (), and the recent, innovative work of Harry Berger. The Spenserian Stanza.

Edmund Spenser devised the Spenserian stanza for his great work The Faerie Queene (). The stanza consists of eight lines of iambic pentameter followed by a single alexandrine, a twelve-syllable iambic line.

The final line typically has a caesura, or break, after the first three feet. The role of the human body as a poetic and ideological construct in the Faerie Queene provides the point of departure for David Lee Miller's richly detailed treatment of Spenser's allegory.

In this major contribution to the study of Renaissance literature and ideology, Miller finds the Author: David Lee Miller. Exemplary Spenser analyses the didactic poetics of The Faerie Queene, renewing attention to its avowed attempt to "fashion a gentleman or noble person in vertuous and gentle discipline" and examining how Spenser mobilises his pedagogic concerns through the reading experience of the poem.

Grogan's. Poetics is the earliest known work of literary criticism. This copy was laid out in lecture note form. Aristotle gives his views on tragedy, the plot, the characters and the content, and then it /5. Spenserian synonyms, Spenserian pronunciation, Spenserian translation, English dictionary definition of Spenserian.

Edmund. English poet known chiefly. Get this from a library. Visionary Spenser and the poetics of early modern Platonism. [Kenneth Borris] -- Platonic concerns and conceptions profoundly affected early modern English and continental poetics, yet the effects have had little attention.

This book defines Platonism's role in early modern. "In a major revisionary study, David Lee Miller now attempts to outline a Spenserian poetics that will let us read the poem with a fuller understanding of the dimensions of. Title: Aristotle's Poetics Author: Aristotle, Edmund Spenser Bouchier Created Date: 9/10/ PM.

The Spenserian stanza is a fixed verse form invented by Edmund Spenser for his epic poem The Faerie Queene (–96). Each stanza contains nine lines in total: eight lines in iambic pentameter followed by a single 'alexandrine' line in iambic rhyme scheme of these lines is ABABBCBCC.Free Online Library: Temperate Conquests: Spenser and the Spanish New World & "The New Poet": Novelty and Tradition in Spenser's Complaints & Spenser and Biblical Poetics.(Review) by "Renaissance Quarterly"; Humanities, general Literature, writing, book reviews Book reviews Books.Poetics is the theory of literary forms and literary discourse.

History. The term "poetics" comes from the Greek ποιητικός poietikos "pertaining to poetry," literally "creative, productive," from ποιητός poietos "made," verbal adjective of ποιεῖν poiein "to make." Scholar T.

.